What’s the difference between a rhyming poem and a story written in rhyming verse?

As you might know, periodically I run a competition for people who love to write in rhyme.

My New Spring Competition is underway as we speak (the deadline is midnight Wednesday 30th October).

Some people have asked the question – what is the difference between a rhyming poem and a story written in rhyming verse? And I thought the easiest way to answer this question was to show you two examples of my own.

 

A poem

The School Magazine – Countdown – Sept 2007 [VOL.92 NO.8]

The School Magazine – Countdown – Sept 2007 [VOL.92 NO.8]

A Story written in rhyming verse

Leo and Millie p1Leo and Millie p2Leo and Millie p3Leo and Millie p4

 

Simply put then – a poem captures a moment, a feeling, an emotion and a story tells a story with a beginning, a middle and and an end.

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8 thoughts on “What’s the difference between a rhyming poem and a story written in rhyming verse?

    • Thank you Stephen – I guess for the purpose of this competition I need have a definition of a poem (being short) and a story (being longer). In the past I’ve found it difficult to compare one type of poem, the shorter variety with stories told in verse so this time I have tried to put them into two categories. This, I agree is not an easy thing to do.

  1. I think your definition is spot on, Jackie, telling us exactly what we need to know. Of course a poem and a story in rhyming verse are both poems, but the difference is not simply line limit: that’s like saying a single article is the same as a book.

  2. Maybe a verse story has an arc, plus some type of change (preferably for the protagonist)? A rhyming bed-time story for children 2-4 years may be well under 75 words because the pictures tell half the story and parents often want a very short story for bed-time!

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